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Rig porn - post your pics!

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  • Chris31Chris31 Member Posts: 21
    Rich2016 said:

    bitcanuck said:

    Not the greatest photo, but the product of several days work (most time wasted dealing with shit PSUs). 4x R9 380 + 1 7950, giving me a total of ~100MH/s. Have another R9 380 and a 280x in the main PC for a total of 140-145MH/s. Should have another R9 380 later this week and that should give me enough for 2 eth/day.


    hey what kind of power supply is that is it powering everything with no problems?
    Thats a server PSU, Im using one made by HP which is 1200W.

    You will have to do a small mods on it. There are some ready made add-on board for it if you dont feel like moding them.

    The cost of PCIE power cables and the mod may not be worth the hassle though and obviously the risk of messing things up which could kill your hardware.
  • metiguemetigue Member Posts: 6

    This thread makes me so happy, knowing I'm not the only mentally ill person that slaps together high wattage computer components in haphazard ways binded by plastic zipties and cooled by wal-mart window fans brings a tear to my geeky eyes. It's not a mental Disorder if enough other people are doing it!!! That's what I say.

    You're the true heroes of the mining world
  • shawn_Blah_Blahshawn_Blah_Blah Member Posts: 57
    Here's the my central fire hazard, or rather mining hub. HEHE.


  • workwork Member Posts: 2,084 ✭✭✭✭
    @bitcanuck that's my favourite picture so far, I think. Reminds me fondly of ghetto rigs haphazardly jerry-rigged around my old condo, maxing the 100amp service and heating the place to tropical levels all winter (with balcony door and windows wide open despite the snow). Good times.
  • adasebadaseb Member Posts: 1,043 ✭✭✭

    Here's the my central fire hazard, or rather mining hub. HEHE.


    Man you really should build some wooden stands at least.



    Should cost less than $10 for 1 or 2 rigs.
  • workwork Member Posts: 2,084 ✭✭✭✭
    @shawn_Blah_Blah that beautiful thing almost brought a tear to my eye!

    @adaseb yea, I think my wooden rigs (including those metal racks in the OP) cost about $20 for 3 of them. Including screws and glue.
  • EthereumMinereuEthereumMinereu Member Posts: 42
    edited April 2016
  • ethfanethfan Member Posts: 458 ✭✭✭
    Looks like the H81 Pro BTC actually. Yea, I was surprised to see them when I got mine. Even comes with a RS232 serial port!
  • CryptuxCryptux Member Posts: 118 ✭✭
    my 2nd farm, work in progress :)


  • o0ragman0oo0ragman0o Member, Moderator Posts: 1,291 mod
    @bitcanuck Got to admit I was feeling pretty nostalgic when I saw BTC Pro's the first time. RS232 AND a Parallel port!
    I have a great affection for RS232 as I wrote a servo controller firmware for PIC16F505. The project consisted of multi-drop bit-blitted 9600baud full duplex serial interface on a that can simultaneously control 42 servos with >10Hz refresh. (for the uninitiated PIC16F505 is probably one of the lowest powered 8-bit microcontrollers you could get nowdays)

    No such ports on my h61's though :(
  • demannudemannu Member Posts: 11
    Blink said:

    kmasp said:

    Blink said:

    Will be doing a full thread w/ buildout, miner setup, etc soon™



    Cards looked really packed in there, does not look like there is a lot of airflow.

    They are not overheating?!
    Fans up front are delta server class fans, temps are about 10c cooler then an open air rig. The lid (not shown) makes one hell of a wind tunnel.

    Another pic for a teaser :wink:


    @Blink

    Mind PM'ing or posting your build specs? I'm getting ready to purchase and install into my work datacenter.. i've done some research but your build looks to be much better than what I had planned on doing :)
  • GEBGEB Member Posts: 14
    Cryptux said:

    my 2nd farm, work in progress :)


    Whats your rig setup specs?

    Thanks,
  • Chris31Chris31 Member Posts: 21

    @bitcanuck Got to admit I was feeling pretty nostalgic when I saw BTC Pro's the first time. RS232 AND a Parallel port!
    I have a great affection for RS232 as I wrote a servo controller firmware for PIC16F505. The project consisted of multi-drop bit-blitted 9600baud full duplex serial interface on a that can simultaneously control 42 servos with >10Hz refresh. (for the uninitiated PIC16F505 is probably one of the lowest powered 8-bit microcontrollers you could get nowdays)

    No such ports on my h61's though :(

    Nice,

    Did you write that in asm?

    Im a PIC guy myself. I wrote most of my prototype on PICMX32 then downgrade to a smaller suitable parts if needed. For simple stuff I love the newish PIC16F1455, can be used as a crystal less USB device. They are so cheap theses days and firmware upgrade make more sense through bootloader using USB rather than UART.
  • o0ragman0oo0ragman0o Member, Moderator Posts: 1,291 mod
    bitcanuck said:

    @o0ragman0o I'm an AVR guy. I prefer ttl serial UART to RS-232. Here's a tx uart I wrote in 14 instructions, that will work at 115.2kbps on an ATtiny13a (~30c ea):

    @bitcanuck Mine was well before the ATTiny's existed. At 4MHz/1MIPs I only had 104 machine cycles between bit blits and in that had to fit not only my TX/RX code but manage a variable pulse train across 6 servos aswell as protocol management. All without hardware UART, PWM, interupts and only 1 8bit timer. Furthermore to get full servo signal resolution at 1MIPs you need to poll the timer every 4 machine cycles. So I had to work out how numerous time bases, a synchronous BAUD rate, another for the servo signal 20ms envolope and an asynchronous one for the individual and variable 0.5~2.5ms duty pulses across 6 servos.

    I managed to cram it all in a 104cyc superloop using the instruction clock as a primary timer synchronised a tad short of 9600baud and the 8bit timer for duty pulses.

    In order to achieve acceptable polling of the timer and therefore acceptable positional resolution on the servos, all tasks had to be cut up into minimally complex subtasks and called one or more times in the superloop. This in itself was hard for lack of jumping by reference instructions. There is one register that can act like a pointer but needs setup code before each call. Because of that each task (TX, RX, Protocol, Servo) had to have it's own resister to keep track of the next subtask callback address. But being only an 8bit register, I had to fit 3 of 4 subtasks, superloop and task switching into 0x0FF words of the 0x1FF program memory! Though I did have a couple of spare instruction cycles to set/reset a paging bit and managed to hoist one of the tasks up into the top page.

    The servo pulse train was a nightmare as I had to manually keep flags on the 8bit timer rollover. Interupts couldn't be used because they would interfere with the BAUD sync. So I was left testing bit 7 effectively reducing it to a 7bit timer trying to resolve over a 2ms span. So I had to let it roll over for additional resolution. Further, the whole set of servo pulse trains had to align to a 20ms boundry which was far beyond the timers limits.

    Anyway, I'm carry on a bit here. The final result was a 2 byte (id select+command+data) protocol that could multidrop across 7 controllers of 6 servos each for a total of 42 DOF. Each server signal had greater than 90 steps resolution (which turned out to still be better than the 9g servo's own positioning error!) and all 42 servo data and signals could be read and refreshed in less than 0.1s. To top it off I also managed to PPM (Pulse Position Modulation) signal from another IO that could directly drive an RC transmitter. All on a 50c 1MIPs microcontroller!

    Was pretty proud of that considering the Microchip application note for full duplex bit-blitted UART could only manage 2400BAUD.

    The project was never commercialised as I did it more for the challenge (kind of like demo scene) of how far you can push such a basic micro. Boards I built are gathering dust while I've been sucked into other projects...like house reno's and ethereum. But it was cool to plug in a cheap blutooth->TTL and drive around hacked together robots with my phone. I'd also rigged up a 12DOF torso out of little 9g servos and double sided tape. :)

    Would still like to put it out to market some day but need to refactor onto a more stable micro.


  • Chris31Chris31 Member Posts: 21
    edited April 2016
    bitcanuck said:

    Chris31 said:

    @bitcanuck Got to admit I was feeling pretty nostalgic when I saw BTC Pro's the first time. RS232 AND a Parallel port!
    I have a great affection for RS232 as I wrote a servo controller firmware for PIC16F505. The project consisted of multi-drop bit-blitted 9600baud full duplex serial interface on a that can simultaneously control 42 servos with >10Hz refresh. (for the uninitiated PIC16F505 is probably one of the lowest powered 8-bit microcontrollers you could get nowdays)

    No such ports on my h61's though :(

    Nice,

    Did you write that in asm?

    Im a PIC guy myself. I wrote most of my prototype on PICMX32 then downgrade to a smaller suitable parts if needed. For simple stuff I love the newish PIC16F1455, can be used as a crystal less USB device. They are so cheap theses days and firmware upgrade make more sense through bootloader using USB rather than UART.
    @Chris31 Yeah, I actually find AVR asm quite simple to code in, even simpler than C/C++ in some ways. I learned 6502 asm as a teenager, since you couldn't do much in BASIC on the computers that were around in the 80's.

    I've recently started into the ARM parts; I have a STM32F030F4P6 soldered on a breakout board on my desk, but BTC and ETH stuff has kept me away from the MCU stuff for the last few months. I will probably build a PWM fan controller for the dell server PSUs I use, and plan to use a t13a for that. I'll use the ADC to sample the current share pin through a voltage divider, and generate a PWM signal to the fan control input. If I want to get fancy I'll monitor the fan tach output and shutdown the PSU if the fan dies.
    I havent touched AVR at all or ARM, would be interesting to know more about them though, if I get the chance that is. Oh the 6502 I think Ataris have them? I remember my first taste of programming, it was on a Z80 board and turning HEX switches to enter the code and if I remember well it has 4 x 7 segment LED displays, man that was painful.

    I might build something similar for my HP server PSU. What it have right now is just a resistor to permanently turn on the PSU and I just soldered a bunch of block connector on to its PCB. Do you find the metal case of your dell PSU running hot? Im thinking of bolting a heatsink on top of my PSU.
  • o0ragman0oo0ragman0o Member, Moderator Posts: 1,291 mod
    Chris31 said:

    Oh the 6502 I think Ataris have them? I remember my first taste of programming...

    And Vic 20's... my first! <3....but without a dataset. ahh... 9 years old and ready to bite the hand that feds me if it went anywhere near that power switch after painstakingly typing out magazine game listings

  • Chris31Chris31 Member Posts: 21

    Chris31 said:

    Oh the 6502 I think Ataris have them? I remember my first taste of programming...

    And Vic 20's... my first!
    ... the excitement of running the program after spending hours typing it all in and only to be presented with a blank screen haha.
  • o0ragman0oo0ragman0o Member, Moderator Posts: 1,291 mod
    I'd ended up knowing some listings by rote and spun out a sales girl with an animation when the C64 hit the shelves.
  • ZorkyZorky Member Posts: 10
    Hi all. It's time for me to present the MiningHive.












    Moderbord: Asus Sabertooth 990fx r2.0
    CPU: Amd fx 8350
    RAM: 16GB
    PSU: Corsair RM 1000i
    SSD: Intel
    GPU (temp in Celsius): 1x 7990 (77/74), 1x 7950 (74), 1x 280x (64).

    Performing ~78MH
  • CryptuxCryptux Member Posts: 118 ✭✭
    @bitcanuck Both H81 and H97, the right miners in the pic are on H97, 6x each. They are in a garage and ambient is close to 1c most of the nights , I have seen GPU temp around 43~ over-clocked on full load mining.

    @GEB R9-390
  • CryptuxCryptux Member Posts: 118 ✭✭
    @Zorky nice setup, cards a bit too close to each other. I suggest invest on some usb risers and increase the gap between them or longer ribbon risers.
  • Martins2040Martins2040 Member Posts: 27
    edited April 2016
    My 4 carded rig, stands out in the garage between tools and winter tires. Its a chilled place:)

    1 X 380X
    1 X 7970
    2 x 280X

    ASUS 775 board with 8 gig ddr3,
    underclocked [email protected] Mhz
    60 gig Intel ssd
    1000 watt Enermax


  • Martins2040Martins2040 Member Posts: 27
  • LagniappeLagniappe Dirty SouthMember Posts: 136 ✭✭
    edited April 2016
    just assembled my third nano rig. , cards came in around 3, I had two choices: A> Do my bullshit econ 203 homework, or B>, assemble the rig. I went with the natural choice. pics in a min.
  • o0ragman0oo0ragman0o Member, Moderator Posts: 1,291 mod
    @Lagniappe Isn't building rigs economics homework? ;)
  • LagniappeLagniappe Dirty SouthMember Posts: 136 ✭✭

    @Lagniappe Isn't building rigs economics homework? ;)

    Absolutely. I'm all in, gotta throw darts to hit the bullseye.
  • workwork Member Posts: 2,084 ✭✭✭✭
    I am more then a bit envious of those Nano rigs. Don't think I could convince myself to buy them under any situation, but I tell you, my wife would get less action if I had those babies in my garage!
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